Peter Bodo's TennisWorld - Rod Laver Don't Fish
Home       About Peter Bodo       Contact        RSS       Follow on Twitter Categories       Archive
Rod Laver Don't Fish 06/29/2009 - 2:03 PM

82702592

by Pete Bodo

Devin Britton is a lanky 18-year-old from the sultry precincts of Brandon, Miss., a state in the deep south best known to sports fans as the ancestral home of the frères Manning, Peyton and Eli. For fans who prefer their violence imagined rather than observed, Mississippi is also the birthplace of the Nobel-Prize winning author William Faulkner. The state flower is the fragrant Magnolia, and the official state fish (who knew there was such a thing?) is the largemouth bass, a pugnacious rascal that eats anything that doesn't eat it first.

Southerners can be a fiercely proud, stubborn lot, imperturbable and not easily discouraged or cowed by the conventional wisdom, especially of the kind that emanates from more cosmopolitan precincts, like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line. I'm not sure this explains why Britton, the best young tennis player to come out of Mississippi in many years, insists on pursing the allegedly passé serve-and-volley game, but he does, and with a degree of fearless resolve that might impress anyone with a trucker's tan and a bumper sticker that reads, Git 'Er Done!

In May, Britton - a freshman at Ole Miss (the University of Mississippi) - became the youngest-ever NCAA singles champion, and he's played well enough since then to be the object of intense interest in the shark tank of pro tennis. So I decided to go out and see for myself, trusting that the big guns of the pro game would easily blow apart their challengers on the day when Wimbledon offered up a menu that might persuade the most gluttonous of tennis gourmand to belch and push back from the table. 

Britton was on Court 19, a show court only in the sense that a fan studying his program might be moved to ask, "Can you show me where Court 19 is?" But don't be deceived. You many never see a Roger Federer or Serena Williams on that piece of lawn, but it's a real gem - strikingly situated between Court 18 (a proper show court) and Court 1, which is a boring stadium like any other, if you ask me. Court 19 is notched into the foot of Henman Hill, and Court 18 rises parallel with it, across a walkway, the nearly vertical stands looking very much like a cliff painted up by a pointillist graffiti artist.

Britton was playing the No. 7 seed, Japan's Shuichi Sekiguchi (there's a triple word score for you in ATP Scrabble), on a hot, humid day that might have reminded Britton of home. When Britton, already leading 4-1, served three aces in the next game, his opponent amiably cracked a big smile and shook his head, absorbing the cruel blow with admirable composure. Although a bout of anxiety by Britton allowed Sekiguchi to close the score to 4-5, Britton pulled himself together, served out the set, and then gave his opponent nothing in set two.

Watching Britton bring the heat and spear the volley, a fan could be forgiven for wondering: Who does this kind think he is, Rod Laver?  Roy Emerson? Stefan Edberg? Pete Sampras? Well, let's not get carried away. If anything, Britton is reminiscent of the Canadian journeyman Philip Bester, in that Bester also had an attack gene that once looked like it might carry him to the top of the game as the next Pat Rafter. Bester has struggled, though, and for complicated reasons not solely related to tennis. Britton is presently at the point Bester was at the peak of his junior career, and the going has been as smooth as his service action.

Britton started playing at tennis age five, tagging along to the country club to watch his mother Cindy do battle in league play. A pro invited him to hit a bit, and Britton took to it. Soon, he was training with some other prospects from the Jackson area, but by the time he was 13 it became obvious that he needed to leave home to develop his game. He was also a good at baseball, but reluctantly gave it up to focus on tennis. "I liked pitching," Britton told me after the match. "I was one of the better ones in my youth baseball days, so that was the toughest sport to quit. On the other hand, I couldn't hit very well at all, so maybe that wasn't such a bad move."

At age 14, having run out of competition in his home state, Britton moved on to the IMG Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy, where he spent three-and-a-half years. Although Bollettieri, via his protégés, has been one of the leading exponents of the baseline game, Britton says that Bollettieri and his staff recognized a natural style when they saw one, and never tried to discourage him from attacking. At Bollettieri's, Britton also said farewell for good to most of his other youthful interests.  He enjoys fishing (being a son of the largemouth bass state and all) but he hasn't even done much of that lately ("Just once in a while, with a couple of other guys from Nick's"). That's okay, Devin, Rod Laver don't fish either.

Britton has a silky service action, and he tosses the ball far enough forward to bring his long frame well into the court with his follow-through; the bio-mechanics are ideal for moving to the net and Britton exploits that fully. His volleys are superb - I don' t believe I've seen a player with such superb touch and placement at a comparable stage in his career since the young Edberg, or Pat Cash. Today, Britton hit numerous drop volleys and acutely angled touch volleys, stretching the court with wisdom beyond his years. And at one point, he took a volley on the backhand side, while approaching, and cut both under and inside the ball in such a way that thing bounced, stopped in mid-air, made a right turn, changed its mind and went back the other way.

Bubba, if he was watching, might have drawled: That didn't work out so bad. . .

It takes a healthy imagination to come up with a shot like that; perhaps that's the Faulkner influence becoming manifest. But slashing your way to the upper echelon of the game - heck, getting up into the Top 100 - is easier said than done. Even in the heyday of serve-and-volley tennis, the style required an acute degree of precision and intensity, coupled with the physical ability to withstand the stresses and strains of all that lunging, stopping and starting. It takes time to develop that game to its finest, requisite degree (see: Pat Rafter). And doing it can burn you out (see: Pat Rafter).

It isn't as if Britton has no inkling of this. Contemplating the challenge, he said, "You can't serve and volley (in today's game), yeah, a bunch of people are saying that. I guess it is what it is. I can't do anything about what they're saying, I can just try to do my best to prove them wrong. I think there's room for that style. I hope I can prove that. But I also feel my groundies can improve much more, and I'm working on them - a lot."

Britton has a very solid two-handed backhand, and he's also comfortable hitting it one-handed, with heavy slice, in order to get to the net. His forehand doesn't look like it's entirely ironed out, but then his game isn't built around it, the way it is for so many successful pros. One of his major challenges will be developing a B game for those times when things aren't exactly clicking with his preferred style - as was the case at Roland Garros this year.

Britton went to Paris with a troublesome hip but with no great fear of pursuing his attacking style on red clay. "I went to the French mostly for the experience," Britton said. who more or less said good-bye to clay courts when he left Mississippi. "But I was serving so terribly in France - there was no point coming in, and guys were just taking the return, doing whatever they wanted. I was running in off nothing, basically. But at least I came back in the second set and got four games."

As Bubba might have drawled, Well, that didn't work out so good.

One of Britton's greatest assets is his second serve - when he's really feeling it, his second serve is almost as lethal as his first, and let's remember that old chestnut: You're only as good as your second serve. Or, to put it in more positive terms: If you've got a great second serve you're going to win a lot of tennis matches. There's no service speed clock on Court 19, so I had to ask the former Little League fireballer what kind of service-speed numbers he clocks on a good day.

"I'm not sure," he replied sheepishly, "I haven't had it clocked it in long time. I would think . . . I can't even guess. I wouldn't mind having a clock out on my court once."

Good things come to he who waits, Devin.


52
Comments
Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Posted by Colette Lewis 06/29/2009 at 02:25 PM

Terrific post on Britton, Pete. Thanks so much turning your entertaining and spot-on powers of analysis on a U.S. junior.

Posted by creig bryan 06/29/2009 at 02:35 PM

Pete:

Thanks for a good read.

ks

Posted by Eric 06/29/2009 at 02:35 PM

2nd

Posted by Eric 06/29/2009 at 02:38 PM

speaking of which, stefan edberg owned possibly the best 2nd serve in the game... maybe britton should tailor a game where he can get to net behind both deliveries and revive the serve-volley style again

Posted by Andrew Friedman 06/29/2009 at 02:51 PM

Fabulous stuff, Pete. Thanks.

Posted by Mike Kilian 06/29/2009 at 02:57 PM

Fantastic read on Devin.

I have had the pleasure of being on the court with Devin many times back when I was taller than him. I can say without reservation that even back then he was one of the most selfless and and honest people I have met. He deserves any success he can earn.

I also have to say that back here in the mother country (I didn't know there was a state fish and I have lived here 40 years) we tend to be cautious with speculation on how much success Mr. Britton might atain.

That's why your piece blew me away. If you, a crafy and expert veterain observer of tennis, can write such an upbeat and positive article, then we are truely encouraged.

Posted by Mike Kilian 06/29/2009 at 03:03 PM

And yes, my spell checker has gone fishing.

Posted by PC 06/29/2009 at 03:20 PM

Greate write up. Nice to know there's a Yank in the wings (other than, ahem, Donald Young. Ahem.)

Posted by Dunlop Maxply 06/29/2009 at 03:31 PM

Well, this is going to be interesting.

There has been quite a bit of assuming going on regarding the current game. I say, assuming, because for there to be proof that its not possible to S/V anymore you would have to see a representative sample of S/V ers getting passed off the court by standard power baseliners, and you simply do not see it.

It will be fun to keep track of Britton's results.

Posted by cesar 06/29/2009 at 03:35 PM

Rafael Nadal does fish a lot.

Posted by Leroy 06/29/2009 at 04:44 PM

Thanks for the post, Pete. Having had the opportunity to watch Devin play recently, I was struck by the contrast between his aggressive serve and volley game and the baseline game played by most everyone else, and the relative ease with which he wins points when things are clicking. As a lifelong Mississippian, I am cautiously hopeful that he will be successful once he turns pro. (To my knowledge he has not yet announced whether he will return to Ole Miss for his sophomore year or turn pro.) Certainly there are many potential career trajectories, but at this point it sure is good to see an up-and-coming American with Devin's potential. Also, it is worth mentioning that he was recently selected as a practice partner for the upcoming Davis Cup tie in Croatia.

Posted by just horsen(southern to the core) 06/29/2009 at 05:56 PM

"Southerners can be a fiercely proud, stubborn lot, imperturbable and not easily discouraged or cowed by the conventional wisdom, especially of the kind that emanates from more cosmopolitan precincts, like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line(you can say that again)"

ya could add easy going, and polite(for the most part) to that list of southern qualites.

Nice piece though, He seems to have a pretty good shot at making it. It'd be cool to have a southerner pro, all these U.S. players are from the north;(

Posted by just horsen(southern to the core) 06/29/2009 at 05:56 PM

"Southerners can be a fiercely proud, stubborn lot, imperturbable and not easily discouraged or cowed by the conventional wisdom, especially of the kind that emanates from more cosmopolitan precincts, like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line(you can say that again)"

ya could add easy going, and polite(for the most part) to that list of southern qualites.

Nice piece though, He seems to have a pretty good shot at making it. It'd be cool to have a southerner pro, all these U.S. players are from the north;(

Posted by just horsen(southern to the core) 06/29/2009 at 05:57 PM

"Southerners can be a fiercely proud, stubborn lot, imperturbable and not easily discouraged or cowed by the conventional wisdom, especially of the kind that emanates from more cosmopolitan precincts, like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line(you can say that again)"

ya could add easy going, and polite(for the most part) to that list of southern qualites.

Nice piece though, He seems to have a pretty good shot at making it. It'd be cool to have a southerner pro, all these U.S. players are from the north;(

Posted by just horsen(southern to the core) 06/29/2009 at 05:57 PM

"Southerners can be a fiercely proud, stubborn lot, imperturbable and not easily discouraged or cowed by the conventional wisdom, especially of the kind that emanates from more cosmopolitan precincts, like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line(you can say that again)"

ya could add easy going, and polite(for the most part) to that list of southern qualites.

Nice piece though, He seems to have a pretty good shot at making it. It'd be cool to have a southerner pro, all these U.S. players are from the north;(

Posted by Proxax 06/29/2009 at 06:00 PM

That didn't work out so bad! I will remember this article, and I hope that the serve and volley styles makes a comeback. I personally enjoy it and change is definitely on the cards. thank YOU

Posted by trent4394 06/29/2009 at 06:07 PM

Andy Roddick is from Texas isnt he?

Posted by Pspace 06/29/2009 at 06:12 PM

Thanks for this one, Pete. I'm definitely in the s&v cannot work camp (as a staple diet). Would happily eat crow if some1 can prove me wrong.

Posted by Leroy 06/29/2009 at 06:44 PM

The serve and volley game might be on hiatus in today's game, but it is not dead. Styles of play in tennis, much like offensive schemes in American football, are cyclical. What works today is passe tomorrow. Let one or two players succeed serving and volleying and others will follow suit. I think now would be the perfect time for a successful serve and volleyer to burst onto the scene. I don't claim to be a tennis historian, but I doubt that there ever has been a time when so many players have so little experience playing against serve and volleyers. The time is ripe.

Posted by smallrain 06/29/2009 at 07:06 PM

Who is next American young gun?
What happen to Donald Young?
I had doubts that he might not survive because of his size.
Not sure why he disappeared!

Posted by jb... (go smiley fed!) 06/29/2009 at 07:09 PM

Very fun read about devin pete! ptenis, ndk and i wandered out to see him at the open last year. actually, we went to see bernard tomic, and devin pulled out the win instead!

i made a note of this devin kid from mississippi, figured i'd look him up again...see if that was a one shot deal or nay. looks like i'll be able to catch some more of him soon enough.. :)

as for the serve n' volley, its kind of funny watching this years wimby, with so many big servers and so many points played at net.. successfully! so maybe there's hope for devin's game yet?

Posted by beth 06/29/2009 at 07:19 PM

Pete - nice read
and I look forward to seeing this young man in the future
being from Memphis originally - Mississippi is almost like home -
and I do love to see a good ole southern boy doing well
hope he can succeed in bringing serve and volley back to the lawns of Wimbledon

as for Roddick - he lives in Texas now , but is originally from Omaha, Nebraska

Posted by Blake 06/29/2009 at 08:21 PM

I'm loving the fact there's so many oldies left on the men's side. It's like we've flashed back to somewhere between 02 and 04. Great stuff!

Posted by Christopher 06/29/2009 at 08:35 PM

Trent- I think Roddick is more from Nebraska and then Florida, though he lives in Texas now (to the extent a pro tennis player actually lives anywhere specific).

Posted by arbiter 06/29/2009 at 09:15 PM

"For fans who prefer their violence imagined rather than observed Mississippi is also the birthplace of the Nobel-Prize winning author William Faulkner." - that is the worst description of Faulkner ever.

And I am not sure if other readers here noticed, but your presentation of the young tennis player has a very strong cynical note in it...in the end we get a picture of a big guy with not so good FH, injured hip, destroyed in Paris. That is all? Oh, yes...and he should "wait" even though he is older than Rafa was when he had his first great success? So, it all sounds more like mocking the young Britton than presenting him.

Posted by Joe Samuel Starnes 06/29/2009 at 10:20 PM

Having caught a big ole largemouth bass as of late, I enjoyed the the references. Also should be noted that in addition to being the home of Faulkner, the formidable writer Barry Harrah lives and writes in Oxford, Mississippi, home of Ole Miss, and is a tennis player himself, not to mention the author of the hilarious tennis novel The Tennis Handsome.

Posted by Sam 06/29/2009 at 10:49 PM

Pete: Thanks for a good read. Will be keeping an eye out for Britton.

"for there to be proof that its not possible to S/V anymore you would have to see a representative sample of S/V ers getting passed off the court by standard power baseliners, and you simply do not see it. "

Well said, Dunlop.

Posted by Jbradhunter 06/29/2009 at 11:11 PM

Pete. Thanks for this piece. If you get a chance, I'd love to hear your thoughts on another Southern American junior, the 15th seed Tennys Sandgren.

Posted by Pspace 06/29/2009 at 11:16 PM

Nice interview from Roger:

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=4294821

Posted by Pspace 06/29/2009 at 11:17 PM

Sorry, wrong thread.

Posted by Nancy J 06/30/2009 at 12:49 AM

In the last few days (post MJ's demise) it seems that I read somewhere (I thought this board -- but I guess that I'm wrong -- must have been an article on Google News) that the game was ripe for a serve and volleyer to come along and beat up on the current preferred game of back court players.

Well, why not!?! The pundits said the time is now -- so I say go for it.

Posted by jewell - Make tea, not war. 06/30/2009 at 02:06 AM

Hey everyone! *waves*

Fun read, and a nice change from all the intensity of Manic Monday and the quarter-finals. :)

One question though (probably stupid and I'll kick myself for not being able to work this out) - who or what is Bubba?

Posted by Ray T. 06/30/2009 at 02:21 AM

Great article...if more youngsters would be groomed to play serve and volley, they would surely be able to match the current level from the baseliners regardless of racket technology or surfaces. Unfortunately that's the hardest way to go and it's wonderful to see kids like Britton sticking to their natural ways of playing. Hope he goes far and gives the baseline clones a true run for their money...

Posted by aussiemarg [Madame President in Comma Rehab for 2009] 06/30/2009 at 04:09 AM

Pete Many thanks for a wonderful story.

Well I cant wait to he hits the hallowed turf of Wimbledon,Queens etc.

Yes its true you are only as good as your second serve indeed.

Hope this young guy with the s/volley game stays true to himself.

Posted by mina (Rafa FTW) 06/30/2009 at 04:53 AM

hello all! i've missed TW a lot due to the IE crash/ lag i've been experiencing whenever i try to open tennis.com

Posted by Pete 06/30/2009 at 06:22 AM

Jewell - "Bubba"is an all-around generic nickname for the good ole boy, because it's always been a common diminuitive, and is usually used with a mixture of affection, although sometimes it's meant to be mortifying.

Posted by jewell, at work 06/30/2009 at 09:10 AM

ah I see. Thanks, Pete. :)

I've only ever come across it used in sinister fashion by Stephen King before...LOL.

Posted by Melville-Read 06/30/2009 at 11:28 AM

"Git 'Er Done?"
"Trucker's Tan"
"More cosmopolitan precincts,
like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line?"
Pete, it's truly remarkable how many people you managed to offend in those first two paragraphs.


P.S.: Is it true that you were one of the ushers at Lew Hoad's wedding?


Posted by American Rebel Tennis 06/30/2009 at 12:14 PM

Pete, needless to say most everyone has made the "great article Pete" accolades already, but I'll say "great article Pete" once again! A change of pace is good in so many ways you know in tennis when appropriate and you've done this quite well going to an upcoming success not only in tennis, but junior tennis.
As a raised and born in Mississippi tennis playing nut who happened to attend that University in Mississippi (living right steps away from those heralded courts down yonder post-Coach Chadwick days called the Magnolia Courts) called Ole Miss which is known for it's sports heritage in football (rising again!) and baseball (doing great too!) and on occasions basketball (sans injuries!), track & field (just birthing in it's infancy!), golf (OK, not too great, but not too bad! ya know how golf is!), well tennis has been a routine top performer which seemingly gets little notice unless you're a tennis die-hard (#4 in 2009 with a very young team!), Devin brought that into fruition unselfishly by dropping from #1 to #2 where he created havoc upon most whom he had met on court in the SEC, then the nation in the NCAA's becoming 'thu champeeon'.
French has been unkind to most Americans if I remember correctly, but feel Devin may just change (in time) the way tennis can be played.
Wimbledon is fun for him as you have well intimated least until we underestimate our opponents, but with self-confidence like that of a Nadal, Federer who knows what Mr. Britton can do and where he'll finish!
Even if he doesn't here, there's the uber-comfortable home back in NYC (can a suutherner say NYC with cumfert? Yeah we can!), he just came up short, an irony considering his ht.) in 2008 by being a runner-up in Jr's so he can get it done "final"-ly on the hard stuff!
Whew! See what a proud American first, Southerner second, with Ole Miss tennis running through his blood, aghast third feels about your writing par excellance Mr. Bodo? Well done covering Jr. Tennis.
We know he'll end way up there in the higher echelon of professional ranks soon!

Posted by maplesugar at work 06/30/2009 at 12:40 PM

Thanks for the tip on the newest talent, Pete. I'll keep my eyes peeled.

Posted by killerC 06/30/2009 at 12:50 PM

Great post!
being a fellow S/V dude, I hope this guy makes it big! Im tired of seeing the power baseline "clones" as some1 put it. Taylor Dent Sv's at the pro lvl pretty well right now... Its a great offensive game, U can win or lose with a bad serve or great play from the other peep ur playing. Look at Sampras/Federer MSG match, it was close with high drama.. the contrast in styles made it fun to watch. Maybe why this tennis era is lacking?? I think the game has been going away with it because individuals are scared to come in, they would rather have time to watch the play happen, not have mistakes and emmulate the wear down- side to side tennis. I myself like ending the points quick and wreckin shop in my ntrp usta tourneys lol. losing happens, yet when you sv its always entertaining. Serve a 95+ mph ball to individuals backhand and chances are you'll notice a blooper back to ya ot seems like or a slow slice; comming in 2-3 times a game while serving, really keeps the returns honest.

Posted by Trevor 06/30/2009 at 03:13 PM

The Mannings are most definately from New Orleans

Posted by TNRebel 06/30/2009 at 05:09 PM

Actually, Trevor, Archie was born and raised in Drew, Mississippi. The person you replied to referred to Mississippi as the ancestral home of Peyton and Eli. This means the home of their ancestors....a-la Archie and his family. Archie lives in New Orleans because that's where his career began, he has business interests there and they love the city. That doesn't mean he always lived there. So, Cooper, Peyton and Eli may be from New Orleans, but their ancestral home (as pointed out by the poster) is definitely (check your spelling) Mississippi.

Posted by TPG REBEL 06/30/2009 at 06:23 PM

Devin is an awesome player and has been since he started playing. My kids played at the same Jr. program he played in - he started from scratch and showed everyone what dedication turns in to. As a Rebel - we sure hope that he will return for his sophomore season. He made us all proud - but what an accomplishment for himself. Way to go Devin!

Posted by Rich 06/30/2009 at 07:41 PM

[i]Trent- I think Roddick is more from Nebraska and then Florida, though he lives in Texas now (to the extent a pro tennis player actually lives anywhere specific).[/i]

Don't know why you would say that considering that Roddick left Nebraska when he was 4 years old!!! He lived in Texas from ages 4-10; Florida from 10-21; & Texas again from 21-present. So in reality he's lived in Texas longer than anywhere else.

Posted by TN Girl 06/30/2009 at 09:13 PM

1) Texas is not part of the south--they think they are their own country most of the time.
2) Florida is not really part of the south.
3) Devin has pure raw natural talent bottled into a giant's body with an "aw shucks" attitude. Devin also has something many "tennis brats" don't have: a very cool (for lack of a better word) mother who holds him accountable. Before he left for IMG he had to WORK (real manual labor) every day blowing off the courts and cleaning up around the PUBLIC tennis facility (Parham Bridges in Jackson, MS) where he played in order to earn money to pay for his raquet stringings. Devin is supremely confident on the court but off the court you could not find a more humble kind level-headed teenager--an even greated rarity if you know the likes of most junior tennis players.

Posted by beth 06/30/2009 at 09:13 PM

Jewell - as Pete said "Bubba " is a term for a good ole southern boy
but really it is a diminutive of brother
many little kids in the south call their brothers bubba - it is an easier word for little guys to say
and the name just sort of grew from there

and the Mannings are indeed from Drew Mississippi
Archie ( the dad ) is from Drew
Olivia ( the mom ) was homecoming queen at Ole Miss - where she and Archie met

the boys were born in New Orleans - they family home is now in the Garden District
but Mississippi is their original home years ago

Posted by nickmagoo 06/30/2009 at 10:40 PM

While its nice to see an article about an up and coming American tennis player, I'm sick and tired of Southern stereotypes being trotted out: trucker's tan, Git 'er done bumper sticker, Bubba, 'Rod Laver don't fish either' (the contraction, nice), etc. Jeez, why do people always make Southerners into bumbling tobacky chawin' hicks?

As for this sentence: "Southerners can be a fiercely proud, stubborn lot, imperturbable and not easily discouraged or cowed by the conventional wisdom, especially of the kind that emanates from more cosmopolitan precincts, like pretty much anywhere north of the Mason-Dixon line." Hm. You can say that about folks from Maine, California, Alaska, etc...not that it's an insult, but again a rather easy meme to use for Southerners. And, of course, Southerners come in every shape and size - it's not like someone from Mississippi is the same as someone from North Carolina or Florida, each with their own distinct cultures and histories. It's like saying someone from Nevada is like someone from Oregon, because they happen to be in the West.

BTW, I would assume most every state in this fair union have a state fish, much like they have state birds, trees, poems, flowers, etc, etc.

Posted by jg 06/30/2009 at 10:49 PM

Great post about an upcoming serve and volleyer. It deserves mention that Devin also won the AEGON International Junior Championships at Roehampton prior to Wimbledon Juniors in both singles and doubles.

Posted by ak 07/01/2009 at 07:59 PM

Seriously Pete? Is this a tennis article or an attempt to stereotype/poke fun at Mississippians in as many different ways as possible? Stick to the tennis.

Posted by freida brock bobson 07/05/2009 at 11:35 PM

I know you are so proud of your son. There is no othe plesure than being the proud parent. Wish him the best of luck

Posted by SpiritMan2007 07/06/2009 at 01:19 PM

Awesome article! Thanks for the great read, Peter.


We are no longer accepting comments for this entry.

<<  The Jellyfish (Wimbledon CC, Day 8) Wimbledon Crisis Centre, Day 7  >>




Wild Women of the U.S. Open
Wild Men of the U.S. Open
Roddick's Imperfect World
"It's Kind of a Dance"
Nadal's Kneeds
The Racquet Scientist: Canadian Tennis
The Long and Short of It
This blog has 3693 entries and 1646148 comments.
More
More Video
Daily Spin